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What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence

This paper uses the STIRPAT model to determine what are the carbon emissions elasticities for income and population and whether those elasticities differ across development/income or population levels. (from Introduction)

Liddle, Brant. 2012. What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence. USAEE Working Paper No. 12-135

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2162222
Working Paper

The China Project

The University Committee on Environment's China Project is a multidisciplinary research program on energy use and environment in China and in Sino-American relations. The program explores integrated policy responses to greenhouse gas emissions by the world's two leading national sources, the U.S. and China, and to local air pollution problems of immediate concern in China. Over 50 researchers from the two countries comprise the team, working in disciplines that range across natural, applied, and health sciences, economics, public policy, law, political science, and business. (from project website)

The China Project

Research Project

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Forecasting societies' adaptive capacities through a demographic metabolism model

In seeking to understand how future societies will be affected by climate change, the authors propose that the concept of demographic metabolism and the associated methods of multi-dimensional population projections provide an effective analytical toolbox to forecast important aspects of societal change that affect adaptive capacity.

Lutz, W. and R. Muttarak. 2017. Forecasting societies' adaptive capacities through a demographic metabolism model. Nature Climate Change 7(3): 177-184.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3222
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States

This is a discussion of the the possible solutions and protection alternatives for climate change displacement for the inhabitants of Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), and particularly of Atolls Islands States.

Yamamoto, L. and M. Esteban. 2017. Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States. International Migration, DOI: 10.1111/imig.12318

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imig.12318
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa

This article examines how migration may act as an intervening and causal variable between environmental change and conflict by combining climate-conflict and environment-migration research. It argues that  to understand the potential propensity of environmental change to lead to conflict in Africa, close attention needs to be paid to local-level manifestations of conflict and (mal)adaptive forms of migration.

Freeman, L. 2017. Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa. The Journal of Environment & Development, doi: 1070496517727325.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1070496517727325
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Recent increases in human pressure and forest loss threaten many Natural World Heritage Sites

In this study we quantify changes in spatial and temporal (1993 and 2009) patterns of human pressure and ecological state across the entire global network of Natural World Heritage Sites (NWHS)  and their surrounding landscapes using two newly available globally consistent data sets that assess changes in human pressure (Human Footprint) and forest loss (Global Forest Watch).

Allan, J. R., O. Venter, S. Maxwell, B. Bertzky, K. Jones, Y. Shi and J. E. M. Watson. 2017.  Recent increases in human pressure and forest loss threaten many Natural World Heritage Sites.  Biological Conservation 206: 47-55.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.12.011
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief

To explore how those in regional Australian coastal communities have coped with repeated natural disasters, focussing on the experience of independent-living older adults, the study used an exploratory, mixed-method, and phenomenological approach, an array of non-probability snowballing techniques to seek participation from residents aged 65 years or more, and from emergency services officers, disaster managers, and community health care providers located in regional communities affected by Cyclone Larry (2006) and Cyclone Yasi (2011).

Sandra, A. 2017. Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief. Geographical Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh

Using high-frequency demographic surveillance data, a discrete time event history approach, and a range of sociodemographic and contextual controls, the study measures the extent to which temperature, precipitation, and flooding can predict temporary migration.

Call, M. A., C. Gray, M. Yunus and M. Emch. 2017. Disruption, not displacement: Environmental variability and temporary migration in Bangladesh.  Global Environmental Change 46(Supplement C): 157-165.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2017.08.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Migration and agrarian transformation in Indigenous Mexico

To analyse the importance of alternative practices surrounding land, labour, governance, and ritual found in the region, the study used the concept of comunalidad, created by Indigenous intellectuals in Oaxaca, Mexico.  The results show that while Indigenous villages are profoundly affected by different forms of migration, migration itself is not necessarily a “death knell” for Indigenous peasants.

Robson, J., D. Klooster, H. Worthen and J. Hernández-Díaz. 2017. Migration and agrarian transformation in Indigenous Mexico. Journal of Agrarian Change, doi: 10.1111/joac.12224

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joac.12224
Journal Article
Year: 2017

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