eLibrary page

Displaying 21 - 30 of 2509

What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence

This paper uses the STIRPAT model to determine what are the carbon emissions elasticities for income and population and whether those elasticities differ across development/income or population levels. (from Introduction)

Liddle, Brant. 2012. What Are the Carbon Emissions Elasticities for Income and Population? New Evidence From Heterogeneous Panel Estimates Robust to Stationarity and Cross-Sectional Dependence. USAEE Working Paper No. 12-135

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2162222
Working Paper

The China Project

The University Committee on Environment's China Project is a multidisciplinary research program on energy use and environment in China and in Sino-American relations. The program explores integrated policy responses to greenhouse gas emissions by the world's two leading national sources, the U.S. and China, and to local air pollution problems of immediate concern in China. Over 50 researchers from the two countries comprise the team, working in disciplines that range across natural, applied, and health sciences, economics, public policy, law, political science, and business. (from project website)

The China Project

Research Project

Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Through joint analysis of data from Community Oil Spill Survey and US Census Bureau products, a place-based index of social vulnerability is developed to examine the relationship between emplaced social vulnerability and impacts on mental health following the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Cope, M. R. and T. Slack. 2017. Emplaced social vulnerability to technological disasters: Southeast Louisiana and the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Population and Environment 38(3): 217-241.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0257-8
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds

To investigate the relationship between climate shocks and migration between rural and urban areas within Mexico, individual records from the 2000 and 2010 Mexican censuses (n = 683,518) were combined with high-resolution climate data from Terra Populus that are linked to census data at the municipality level (n = 2321). Then climate shocks were measured as monthly deviation from a 30-year (1961–1990) long-term climate normal period, and uncover important nonlinearities using quadratic and cubic specifications.

Nawrotzki, R. J., J. DeWaard, M. Bakhtsiyarava and J. T. Ha. 2017. Climate shocks and rural-urban migration in Mexico: exploring nonlinearities and thresholds. Climatic Change 140(2): 243-258.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-016-1849-0
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States

This is a discussion of the the possible solutions and protection alternatives for climate change displacement for the inhabitants of Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), and particularly of Atolls Islands States.

Yamamoto, L. and M. Esteban. 2017. Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States. International Migration, DOI: 10.1111/imig.12318

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imig.12318
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal

The paper report that more than 60 percent of the population of Nepal falls in the moderate to high vulnerability categories with the lack of adaptive capacity as the biggest cause of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal.

Mainali, J. and N. G. Pricope. 2017. High-resolution spatial assessment of population vulnerability to climate change in Nepal. Applied Geography 82: 66-82.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.03.008
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief

To explore how those in regional Australian coastal communities have coped with repeated natural disasters, focussing on the experience of independent-living older adults, the study used an exploratory, mixed-method, and phenomenological approach, an array of non-probability snowballing techniques to seek participation from residents aged 65 years or more, and from emergency services officers, disaster managers, and community health care providers located in regional communities affected by Cyclone Larry (2006) and Cyclone Yasi (2011).

Sandra, A. 2017. Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief. Geographical Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Syllabus: SOC 4312.Population and Environment

Course Syllabus.  This course focuses on the relationship between human population and the environment. Students will learn about diverse populations, recent dynamics of world population, their effects on the global environmental systems, and reciprocal effects of environment on population growth and spatial distribution. In order to understand the current patterns of population growth, students will study the history of human populations and how characteristics of humans led to increased abundance of resources and high population growth. The course will also include case studies of human groups/societies that thrived or disappeared when faced with specific environmental conditions.  Future changes in population and environmental conditions will be also studied so students will be able to understand and work with the idea of global, sustainable human society.

SOC 4312.Population and Environment. Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work, texas Tech University

Educational Resource
Year: 2017

Forecasting societies' adaptive capacities through a demographic metabolism model

In seeking to understand how future societies will be affected by climate change, the authors propose that the concept of demographic metabolism and the associated methods of multi-dimensional population projections provide an effective analytical toolbox to forecast important aspects of societal change that affect adaptive capacity.

Lutz, W. and R. Muttarak. 2017. Forecasting societies' adaptive capacities through a demographic metabolism model. Nature Climate Change 7(3): 177-184.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3222
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Pages