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The Earth as transformed by human action: Global and regional changes in the biosphere over the past 300 Years

A symposium of chapters on the various kinds of impact humans have had on our habitat.

Clark, W.C.; Turner, B.L.; Kates, R.W.; Richards, J.F.; Mathews, J.T.; Meyer, W., (eds.). 1990. The Earth as transformed by human action: Global and regional changes in the biosphere over the past 300 Years. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Book
Year: 1990

New world pleistocene extinctions, system dynamics and carrying capacity: A critique of Whittington and Dyke.

In previous computer simulation models of Pleistocene/Holocene megafaunal extinctions carrying capacities of both herbivores and humans are fixed values. For the animals in question, herbivores and humans, carrying capacity is largely determined by food. A simulation using the values of the previous models and a dynamic definition of carrying capacity is presented. This suggests that overkill, as presented in previous simulation models, is not possible. (Author's abstract)

Whitney-Smith, E. 1989. New world pleistocene extinctions, system dynamics and carrying capacity: A critique of Whittington and Dyke.

Online Publication
Year: 1989

Population and environment in the hills of Nepal

Thapa, G. B; Weber, K. E. 1989. Population and environment in the hills of Nepal. Asia-Pacific Population Journal 4(2):49-70.

Journal Article
Year: 1989

The environmental dimensions of National Security.

While the attention of national leaders in both East and West is focused mainly on the balance of their conventional and nuclear military forces - “star wars”, and military turmoil in the Middle East and Central America - they are allowing the very basis of national security to evaporate.  (from Authors' Abstract)

Ehrlich, P. and A. Ehrlich. 1989. The Environmental Dimensions of National Security. Global Problems and Common Security: Annals of Pugwash 1988. J. Rotblat and V. I. Goldanskii. Berlin, Heidelberg, Springer Berlin Heidelberg: 180-190.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-75072-4_24
Chapter in Book
Year: 1989

Global change and our common future: Papers from a forum.

This book is the product of the Forum on Global Change and Our Common Future, held on May 2-3, 1989 in Washington, D.C. A different scientist or policy maker authored each of the 22 chapters. Authors include Gro Harlem Brundtland, Peter Vitousek, Lester Brown, and Albert Gore.

DeFries, R. S. and Malone, T. F. 1989. Global change and our common future: Papers from a forum. Washington DC: National Academy Press.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17226/1411
Book
Year: 1989

Population and resources in western intellectual traditions.

An examination of the intersection of science and ideology in the development of Western thought on population, resources, and the environment since the industrial revolution.

Tietelbaum, M. S. and Winter, J. M. 1989. Population and resources in western intellectual traditions. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Book
Year: 1989

Biodiversity

The source of this book is the National Forum on Biodiversity, held in Washington, D.C., on September 21-24, 1986, under the auspices of the National Academy of Sciences and Smithsonian Institution. A different scientist authored each of the 56 chapters. Authors include Paul Ehrlich, Norman Myers, Peter Vitousek, and Lester Brown.

Wilson, E. O. and Peter, F. M., (eds.). 1988. Biodiversity. Washigton DC: National Academy Press.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17226/989
Book
Year: 1988

Population pressures and agricultural development in developing countries: A conceptual framework and recent evidence

In this paper, a more comprehensive conceptual approach for investigating the responses to increases in rural population density in developing countries was developed; and recent empirical evidence illustrating these responses was presented.

Bilsborrow, R. 1987. Population pressures and agricultural development in developing countries: A conceptual framework and recent evidence. World Development 15(2):183-203.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0305-750X(87)90077-5
Journal Article
Year: 1987

The intrusion of human population into forest and range lands of California

Demographic and economic growth are pushing deeper into California's forest and range lands, making effective fire protection and traditional industrial uses of the land more difficult. Urban forces that will increase the difficulties in the future include: increasing urban population pressures, selective migration, low-priced housing, adequate infrastructure, decentralized development, and government inadequacies. Some compensating trends that will tend to restrict growth and minimize problems include a near-term weakening of the rural economy, few major planned developments, growth opposition, more integrated recreation uses, zoning for larger parcel sizes, and stabilization of tax benefits such as the Timber Production Zone. (Author's abstract)

Bradshaw, T. D. 1987. The intrusion of human population into forest and range lands of California. In: Davis, James B.; Martin, Robert E., technical coordinators. 1987. Proceedings of the Symposium on Wildland Fire 2000, April 27-30, 1987, South Lake Tahoe, California. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-101. Berkeley, CA: Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; p. 15-21

Conference Paper
Year: 1987

Land degradation and society

The authors examine land degradation in socialist countries.

Blaikie, P. and Brookfield, H. 1987. Land degradation and society. New York, NY: Metheun and Company, Ltd.

Book
Year: 1987

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