eLibrary page

Displaying 41 - 50 of 2509

Environmental inequality and pollution advantage among immigrants in the United States

The authors combine sociodemographic information from the American Community Survey with toxicity-weighted chemical concentrations (Toxics Release Inventory) to model the relationship between toxin exposure and the relative population of recent immigrants across Public Use Microdata Areas (PUMAs, n = 2054) during 2005–2011 to investigate whether new international migrants in the U.S. are exposed to environmental hazards and how this pattern varies among immigrant subpopulations (e.g., Hispanics, Asian, European).

Bakhtsiyarava, M. and R. J. Nawrotzki. 2017. Environmental inequality and pollution advantage among immigrants in the United States. Applied Geography 81: 60-69.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.02.013
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Migration and agrarian transformation in Indigenous Mexico

To analyse the importance of alternative practices surrounding land, labour, governance, and ritual found in the region, the study used the concept of comunalidad, created by Indigenous intellectuals in Oaxaca, Mexico.  The results show that while Indigenous villages are profoundly affected by different forms of migration, migration itself is not necessarily a “death knell” for Indigenous peasants.

Robson, J., D. Klooster, H. Worthen and J. Hernández-Díaz. 2017. Migration and agrarian transformation in Indigenous Mexico. Journal of Agrarian Change, doi: 10.1111/joac.12224

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joac.12224
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation

Drawing on interviews and ethnographic field work with women in 2 local development organizations in San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas, México undertaken over 8 weeks in 2014 and 2015, this paper explores how place-based approaches to climate change adaptation and mitigation interact with processes and ideas operating at national and global scales.

Lookabaugh, L. 2017. Talking About the Weather in Chiapas, Mexico: Rural Women's Approaches to Climate Change Adaptation. The Latin Americanist 61(1): 61-80.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tla.12101
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa

This article examines how migration may act as an intervening and causal variable between environmental change and conflict by combining climate-conflict and environment-migration research. It argues that  to understand the potential propensity of environmental change to lead to conflict in Africa, close attention needs to be paid to local-level manifestations of conflict and (mal)adaptive forms of migration.

Freeman, L. 2017. Environmental Change, Migration, and Conflict in Africa. The Journal of Environment & Development, doi: 1070496517727325.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1177/1070496517727325
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati

The study using a questionnaire (n = 60) as the primary method of data collection, explores  how local community members have taken it upon themselves to respond to the impacts of climate change by utilizing a number of different strategies. The results show that: first, respondents consider climate change to be the most concerning issue for sustaining their livelihoods; second, respondents have built physical defences, relocated temporarily or permanently, and sought government assistance to adapt to localized climate-related impacts; and third, the majority of respondents indicated that they would migrate as a long term strategy to respond to the future impacts of climate change.

Allgood, L. and K. E. McNamara. 2017. Climate-induced migration: Exploring local perspectives in Kiribati. Singapore Journal of Tropical Geography 38(3): 370-385.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/sjtg.12202
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees

This article analyzes how the international community is dealing with the concept of climate change refugees, an emergent and undeniable reality.

Berchin, I. I., I. B. Valduga, J. Garcia and J. B. S. O. de Andrade Guerra. 2017. Climate change and forced migrations: An effort towards recognizing climate refugees. Geoforum 84(Supplement C): 147-150.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.geoforum.2017.06.022
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste

The study investigated the links between household agricultural activities and children's physical growth in two agro-ecologically varying field sites: lowland Natarbora and mountainous Ossu in order to redress a lack of research that clearly demonstrates how agriculture impacts on nutrition in Timor-Leste.

Thu, P. M. and D. S. Judge. 2017. Household agricultural activities and child growth: evidence from rural Timor-Leste. Geographical Research, DOI: 10.1111/1745-5871.12221

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12221
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Air quality, health, and climate implications of China’s synthetic natural gas development

Using an integrated assessment approach, this paper quantifies the air quality, human health, and CO2 emission impacts of China’s SNG strategy.  The authors used the ECLIPSE_V5a_CLE scenario (evaluating the climate and air quality impacts of short-lived pollutants) for 2020 as base case as it reflects the air pollution policies and regulations in place for China’s 12th Five-Year Plan (FYP).

Qin, Y., F. Wagner, N. Scovronick, W. Peng, J. Yang, T. Zhu, K. R. Smith and D. L. Mauzerall. 2017. Air quality, health, and climate implications of China’s synthetic natural gas development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1703167114

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1703167114
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment

The author developed an Australian-orientated model, the Carrying Capacity Dashboard to explore temporal flexibility in resource-based carrying capacity modelling. The model offers users the ability to choose projected time frames of between one and 150 years for a variety of landscape scales and consumption patterns.

Lane, M. 2017. Exploring short-term and long-term time frames in Australian population carrying capacity assessment. Population and Environment 38(3): 309-324.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0264-9
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Syllabus: Global Weirding? Climate change and population dynamics

Climate change will have wide ranging implications for society over the course of the 21st century. A demographic perspective is critical for understanding social vulnerability to climate impacts, as well as the possible outcomes of those impacts, such as migration, morbidity and mortality. Based on a multidisciplinary approach, the seminar introduces demographic, sociological and geographical tools and concepts to systematically analyse differential impacts of climate change (owing to social vulnerability and adaptive capacity) as well as the potential implications of climate change for health and wellbeing, conflict and migration. Both past trends and patterns and future scenarios will be considered as well as a range of geographic scales and contexts (i.e., local to global, urban and rural).

de Sherbinin, Alex and Raya Muttarak. 2017 Seminar Title: Global Weirding? Climate change and population dynamics. European Forum Alpbach, 17‐22 August 2017.

Educational Resources
Year: 2017

Pages