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Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way?

Using the case of Shishmaref, Alaska, a rural Iñupiat community on the northwest coast of Alaska facing habitual flooding disasters linked to climate change, this article integrates research on disasters and climate change-induced migration with emerging perspectives from environmental psychology and the psychology of natural disasters to consider the potential costs of particular migration scenarios.

Wolsko, C. and E. Marino. 2016. Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way? Population and Environment 37(4): 411-428.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0248-1
Year: 2016

Population recovery in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: exploring the potential role of stage migration in migration systems

Taking the Orleans Parish as case study over a 5-year period, between the start of the post-Katrina period (2006) and each subsequent year (2007, 2008,2009,2010), the study shows how population displacement from and, ultimately, recovery in a disaster-affected area ripples through migration systems, both directly and indirectly, redistributing populations as a means of coping with and recovering from a disaster’s impacts.

DeWaard, J., K. J. Curtis and E. Fussell. 2016. Population recovery in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina: exploring the potential role of stage migration in migration systems. Population and Environment 37(4): 449-463.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0250-7
Year: 2016

Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines

Using raw, individual-level census data for the Philippines, the authors developed social vulnerability indices at the most basic level of governance, the barangay, to establish relationships between the derived vulnerability measurements and flood exposure and the impacts of coastal flash floods triggered by Tropical Storm Washi in the southern Philippines in December 2011.

Ignacio, J. Andres F.; Cruz, Grace T.; Nardi, Fernando; Henry, Sabine. 2016. Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):91–129

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s91
Year: 2016

Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research

The authors discussed four reasons as to why only a few chinese demographers are invloved in climate change research: topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; the discomfort with addressing population and environment issues; and, limitations in funding.

Peng, Xizhe and Zhu, Qin. 2016. Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):29–31

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s29
Year: 2016

A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand

The paper presented a new DE analysis for the southern Thai province of Phang Nga (located north of Phuket), to assess future population-environment interactions, and in particular the vulnerability of coastal populations to environmental factors and their future adaptive capacity. The analysis assesses population changes in the four-dimensional space, as defined by age, sex, level of education, and labour force participation

Loichinger, Elke; KC, Samir; Lutz, Wolfgang. 2016. A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):263–287

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s263
Year: 2016

Will climate change shift demography’s ‘normal science’?

The authors discussed why demographers and population scientists should now be involved in climate change research. They provided four key points: while environmental aspects of classic demographic theories have not been emphasized in population research, there is evidence of recent change; the data and the methodological challenges that have discouraged demographers from integrating environmental considerations are being addressed; there are demographers who are emphasizing climate change; and, there are opportunities for including climate change issues in population
research.

Hunter, Lori M. and Menken, Jane. 2016. Will climate change shift demography’s ‘normal science’?  Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):23–28

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s23
Year: 2016

Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai

Using spatial methods to test the hypothesis that there are higher levels of social vulnerability in flood-prone areas of New York City and
Mumbai, the authors employed census data to develop social vulnerability indices of the cities, New York City and Mumbai, then overlaid the SoVI scores onto flood extent maps for Hurricane Sandy (New York, October 2012) and the Mumbai flash floods (July 2005).

de Sherbinin, Alex; Bardy, Guillem. 2016. Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):131–165

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s131
Year: 2016

Two statements on population and sustainable development produced by global scientific panels in 2002 and 2012

The author highlights the contributions demographers can make to research on sustainable development, especially by providing estimates and forecasts of population dynamics, which are fundamental to policy design.

Lutz, Wolfgang. 2016. Two statements on population and sustainable development produced by global scientific panels in 2002 and 2012. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 37–45

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s37
Year: 2016

DHS Modeled Map Surfaces

The DHS Program provides a standard set of spatially modeled map surfaces for recent population-based survey. Each modeled surfaces is produced using standardized geostatistical methods, publically available DHS data, and a standardized set of covariates across countries. Each map package contains a mean estimate surface, an uncertainty surface, and corresponding information on the model creation process and validation.

Spatial Data Repository, The Demographic and Health Surveys Program. Modeled Surfaces. ICF International. Funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Available from spatialdata.dhsprogram.com

Year: 2016

Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean

Using a 14-year MODIS time series, between 2000 and 2014, the study calculated statistical trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI—a spectral index representing vegetation cover) to identify areas where vegetation cover has either increased or decreased.  There are 125 study areas chosen where statistically significant changes in NDVI were found and used time series of monthly rainfall, Landsat images, Google Earth images and environmental GIS layers to identify the type and cause of landscape changes.

Levin, N. 2016.  Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean.  Regional Environmental Change 16(4): 1197-1211.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0848-4
Year: 2016

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