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Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress

More of the Earth’s land surface could experience dangerous heat, and those regions already exposed could encounter such conditions more often, thus the study emphasize that the potentially deadly consequences of heat stress linked to global warming, even if limited to the 1.5 °C Paris target, should not be overlooked.

Matthews, T. K. R., R. L. Wilby and C. Murphy. 2017. Communicating the deadly consequences of global warming for human heat stress. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 114(15): 3861–3866.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1617526114
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief

To explore how those in regional Australian coastal communities have coped with repeated natural disasters, focussing on the experience of independent-living older adults, the study used an exploratory, mixed-method, and phenomenological approach, an array of non-probability snowballing techniques to seek participation from residents aged 65 years or more, and from emergency services officers, disaster managers, and community health care providers located in regional communities affected by Cyclone Larry (2006) and Cyclone Yasi (2011).

Sandra, A. 2017. Ageing in remote and cyclone-prone communities: geography, policy, and disaster relief. Geographical Research, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12228
Journal Article
Year: 2017

“Ghost cities” identification using multi-source remote sensing datasets: A case study in Yangtze River Delta

For the last three decades, rapid and uncontrolled urbanization has given rise to “ghost cities” in China. A  framework to monitor “ghost cities” in Yangtze River Delta was proposed based on multi-source remote sensing datasets, including nighttime light imagery, land cover type products and population grid.

Zheng, Q., Y. Zeng, J. Deng, K. Wang, R. Jiang and Z. Ye. 2017. “Ghost cities” identification using multi-source remote sensing datasets: A case study in Yangtze River Delta. Applied Geography 80: 112-121.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apgeog.2017.02.004
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Understanding the linkages between migration and household food security in India

Using primary survey data collected from 392 rural households from a district in western Bihar in India, results show that although most of the surveyed households had low incomes migrant households had higher overall incomes than non-migrant households, mainly because of the effects of remittances.

Choithani, C. 2017. Understanding the linkages between migration and household food security in India. Geographical Research 55(2): 192-205.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1745-5871.12223
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Syllabus: Global Weirding? Climate change and population dynamics

Climate change will have wide ranging implications for society over the course of the 21st century. A demographic perspective is critical for understanding social vulnerability to climate impacts, as well as the possible outcomes of those impacts, such as migration, morbidity and mortality. Based on a multidisciplinary approach, the seminar introduces demographic, sociological and geographical tools and concepts to systematically analyse differential impacts of climate change (owing to social vulnerability and adaptive capacity) as well as the potential implications of climate change for health and wellbeing, conflict and migration. Both past trends and patterns and future scenarios will be considered as well as a range of geographic scales and contexts (i.e., local to global, urban and rural).

de Sherbinin, Alex and Raya Muttarak. 2017 Seminar Title: Global Weirding? Climate change and population dynamics. European Forum Alpbach, 17‐22 August 2017.

Educational Resources
Year: 2017

Syllabus: SDEV W3400 - Human Populations and Sustainable Development

Demographic processes and their outcomes in terms of population size, distribution and characteristics have a fundamental role in sustainable development and also broad policy implications. This course will introduce students to the scientific study of human populations as a contribution toward their understanding of social structure, relations, and dynamics, as well as society-nature interactions. We will consider the implications for population-environment relationships in the context of consumption trends, economic development, sustainability and cultural change.

Adamo, S. 2017. SDEV W3400 - Human Populations and Sustainable Development. Columbia University.

Educational Resources
Year: 2017

Syllabus: WWS 594-0 - Urbanization, Migration and Climate Change

This course will examine two hallmark demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of the 21st century: urbanization and migration. It will place those changes in the context of climate-change adaptation and mitigation, and consider policy and programs that address these issues. The course will focus on changes in a developing-country context. Students will learn to examine theory and evidence (data and methods) that is used at the local, national and international level to understand populations at risk in the short and long-run, internal and international migration flows, city-growth and urban dynamism in the context of short and long-term climate-change related hazards (e.g., increased storms and associated flooding, sea-level rise, drought, changes in disease vectors, and so on).

Balk, Deborah. 2017. WWS 594-0 - Urbanization, Migration and Climate Change. Princeton University

Educational Resources
Year: 2017

Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States

This is a discussion of the the possible solutions and protection alternatives for climate change displacement for the inhabitants of Small Islands Developing States (SIDS), and particularly of Atolls Islands States.

Yamamoto, L. and M. Esteban. 2017. Migration as an Adaptation Strategy for Atoll Island States. International Migration, DOI: 10.1111/imig.12318

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/imig.12318
Journal Article
Year: 2017

Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer

The author outlines the challneges facing a demographer who wanted to venture into climate change research: the complexity of climate science and the limitations of data and methods for integrating the environmental and climate context into the microdata commonly used by demographers; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; and, the research topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography.

Hayes, Adrian C. 2016. Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):33–36

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s33
Journal Article
Year: 2016

A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand

The paper presented a new DE analysis for the southern Thai province of Phang Nga (located north of Phuket), to assess future population-environment interactions, and in particular the vulnerability of coastal populations to environmental factors and their future adaptive capacity. The analysis assesses population changes in the four-dimensional space, as defined by age, sex, level of education, and labour force participation

Loichinger, Elke; KC, Samir; Lutz, Wolfgang. 2016. A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):263–287

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s263
Journal Article
Year: 2016

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