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By all measures: an examination of the relationship between segregation and health risk from air pollution

The paper examines how the health risk from industrial toxins varies by the 19 most commonly used residential segregation measures using segregation measures for the 331 Metropolitan/Primary Metropolitan (M/PMSA) in the continental United States.

Ard, K. 2016. By all measures: an examination of the relationship between segregation and health risk from air pollution. Population and Environment 38(1): 1-20

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0251-6
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective

Using the 2015 meeting of the Population Association of America program, the author discussed the possible reason why demographers are reluctant to address population and environmental issues.

McDonald, Peter. 2016. Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 15–17

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s15
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research

The author lsited her arguments as to why population scientists should get involved in the climate change studies.

Gage, Anastasia J. 2016. The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 19–22

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s19
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Using data of households affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, extracted from the Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) of the 2006 ACS , the study presents a micro-level migration-income model for a disaster of catastrophic dimensions.

Do Yun, S. and B. S. Waldorf. 2016. The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Journal of Regional Science 56(3): 420-441

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jors.12250
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Human migration: Climate and the peopling of the world

The authors discussed the most comprehensive climate, vegetation and human-dispersal modelling study performed so far as presented Timmermann and Friedrich in a paper online in Nature.

deMenocal, P. B. and C. Stringer. 2016. Human migration: Climate and the peopling of the world. Nature, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature19471

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature19471
Journal Article
Year: 2016

A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand

The paper presented a new DE analysis for the southern Thai province of Phang Nga (located north of Phuket), to assess future population-environment interactions, and in particular the vulnerability of coastal populations to environmental factors and their future adaptive capacity. The analysis assesses population changes in the four-dimensional space, as defined by age, sex, level of education, and labour force participation

Loichinger, Elke; KC, Samir; Lutz, Wolfgang. 2016. A four-dimensional population module for the analysis of future adaptive capacity in the Phang Nga province of Thailand. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):263–287

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s263
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer

The author outlines the challneges facing a demographer who wanted to venture into climate change research: the complexity of climate science and the limitations of data and methods for integrating the environmental and climate context into the microdata commonly used by demographers; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; and, the research topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography.

Hayes, Adrian C. 2016. Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):33–36

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s33
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research

The authors discussed four reasons as to why only a few chinese demographers are invloved in climate change research: topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; the discomfort with addressing population and environment issues; and, limitations in funding.

Peng, Xizhe and Zhu, Qin. 2016. Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):29–31

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s29
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Late Pleistocene climate drivers of early human migration

Using a numerical reaction/diffusion human dispersal model, the study set out to quantify the effects of climate on human dispersal over the last glacial period.

Timmermann, A. and T. Friedrich. 2016. Late Pleistocene climate drivers of early human migration. Nature 538(7623): 92-95

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature19365
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand

Using a unique panel surveys dataset from rural Thailand, the paper explores the causes cited by surveyed household members for why the respondent’s household had a bad income year, and the associated demographic characteristics across households in which the respondent reported that environmental and other economic problems represented risk factors.

Meijer-Irons, Jacqueline. 2016. Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):167–191

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s167
Journal Article
Year: 2016

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