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Environmental Migration and Social Inequality

This is a collection of leading-edge research from leading international scholars on the link between environmental migration and social/economic inequality. It presents recent mpirical evidence on environmental migration dynamics from Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, China, Ghana, Haiti, Mexico, and Turkey.

McLeman, Robert, Schade, Jeanette, Faist, Thomas (Eds.). 2016. Environmental Migration and Social Inequality. Advances in Global Change Research, Vol. 61. Springer International Publishing.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-25796-9
Year: 2016

At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland

Using a unique time series of aerial photographs from 1936 to 2006, the authors argue that understanding rates at which marginal lands in the Great Plains are used for cultivation since the Great Depression requires understanding the interacting dynamics of demography, technology and policy.

Sylvester, K. M., M. P. Gutmann and D. G. Brown. 2016. At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland. Population and Environment 37(3): 362-390.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0242-7
Year: 2016

Future differential vulnerability to natural disasters by level of education

Based on the estimation from cross-country time series of natural disaster mortality for the years 1970–2010 in 174 countries, the study showed that countries with a higher proportion of women with at least secondary education experienced far fewer deaths due to climate-related extreme natural events.

Striessnig, Erich; Loichinger, Elke. 2016. Future differential vulnerability to natural disasters by level of education. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):221–240

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s221
Year: 2016

Can indigenous transborder migrants affect environmental governance in their communities of origin? Evidence from Mexico

Lira, M. G., J. P. Robson and D. J. Klooster.  2016.  Can indigenous transborder migrants affect environmental governance in their communities of origin? Evidence from Mexico.  Population and Environment 37(4): 464-478.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0247-2
Year: 2016

The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research

The author lsited her arguments as to why population scientists should get involved in the climate change studies.

Gage, Anastasia J. 2016. The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 19–22

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s19
Year: 2016

Climate, migration, and the local food security context: introducing Terra Populus

The article introduces a new, publically available data extraction system Terra Populus (TerraPop), which was designed to facilitate population–environment studies.  The use of TerraPop was showcased by exploring variations in the climate–migration association in Burkina Faso and Senegal based on differences in the local food security context.

Nawrotzki, R. J., A. M. Schlak and T. A. Kugler. 2016. Climate, migration, and the local food security context: introducing Terra Populus. Population and Environment 38(2): 164-184.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0260-0
Year: 2016

The Atlas of Environmental Migration

Building on existing knowledge, data and case studies produced over the years by IOM, other international organizations, academia and researchers worldwide, the project will resulted in the first Atlas of Environmental Migration, an innovative tool providing a visual overview of this trend of human migration through maps, illustrations and explanatory texts prepared under the supervision of world experts in this field.

Ionesco, Dina ; Mokhnacheva, Daria; Gemenne, François. 2016. The Atlas of Environmental Migration.Taylor & Francis Group

Year: 2016

The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Using data of households affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, extracted from the Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) of the 2006 ACS , the study presents a micro-level migration-income model for a disaster of catastrophic dimensions.

Do Yun, S. and B. S. Waldorf. 2016. The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Journal of Regional Science 56(3): 420-441

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jors.12250
Year: 2016

Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai

Using spatial methods to test the hypothesis that there are higher levels of social vulnerability in flood-prone areas of New York City and
Mumbai, the authors employed census data to develop social vulnerability indices of the cities, New York City and Mumbai, then overlaid the SoVI scores onto flood extent maps for Hurricane Sandy (New York, October 2012) and the Mumbai flash floods (July 2005).

de Sherbinin, Alex; Bardy, Guillem. 2016. Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):131–165

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s131
Year: 2016

Climate variability and inter-provincial migration in South America, 1970–2011

The paper examines the effect of climate variability on human migration in South America, by quantifying human migration responses to climate variability using over 21 million observations of adults aged 15–40 from 25 censuses conducted in eight South American countries.

Thiede, B., C. Gray and V. Mueller. 2016. Climate variability and inter-provincial migration in South America, 1970–2011. Global Environmental Change 41: 228-240.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2016.10.005
Year: 2016

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