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Newcomers and oldtimers: Do classification methods matter in the study of amenity migration impacts in rural America?

Drawing on household survey data from nine communities in north-central Colorado, this study applies five migrant–non-migrant classification methods to examine how the differences/similarities between the migrants and non-migrants (or ‘‘newcomers’’ and ‘‘oldtimers’’) may vary across different approaches.

Qin, H. 2016. Newcomers and oldtimers: Do classification methods matter in the study of amenity migration impacts in rural America? Population and Environment 38(1): 101-114

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0252-5
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai

Using spatial methods to test the hypothesis that there are higher levels of social vulnerability in flood-prone areas of New York City and
Mumbai, the authors employed census data to develop social vulnerability indices of the cities, New York City and Mumbai, then overlaid the SoVI scores onto flood extent maps for Hurricane Sandy (New York, October 2012) and the Mumbai flash floods (July 2005).

de Sherbinin, Alex; Bardy, Guillem. 2016. Social vulnerability to floods in two coastal megacities: New York City and Mumbai. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):131–165

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s131
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Will climate change shift demography’s ‘normal science’?

The authors discussed why demographers and population scientists should now be involved in climate change research. They provided four key points: while environmental aspects of classic demographic theories have not been emphasized in population research, there is evidence of recent change; the data and the methodological challenges that have discouraged demographers from integrating environmental considerations are being addressed; there are demographers who are emphasizing climate change; and, there are opportunities for including climate change issues in population
research.

Hunter, Lori M. and Menken, Jane. 2016. Will climate change shift demography’s ‘normal science’?  Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):23–28

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s23
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita

Using data of households affected by hurricanes Katrina and Rita, extracted from the Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS) of the 2006 ACS , the study presents a micro-level migration-income model for a disaster of catastrophic dimensions.

Do Yun, S. and B. S. Waldorf. 2016. The day after the disaster: forced migration and income loss after hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Journal of Regional Science 56(3): 420-441

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jors.12250
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Climate shocks and the timing of migration from Mexico

Using combined detailed migration histories and socio-demographic data from the Mexican Migration Project (MMP)2 with daily temperature and precipitation information from the Global Historical Climate Network–Daily (GHCN-D), the study explores the temporally lagged association between a climate shock and future migration and analyzed the risk of Mexico-US migration over a seven-year period after a climate shock

Nawrotzki, R. J. and J. DeWaard. 2016. Climate shocks and the timing of migration from Mexico. Population and Environment 38(1): 72-100

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0255-x
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines

Using raw, individual-level census data for the Philippines, the authors developed social vulnerability indices at the most basic level of governance, the barangay, to establish relationships between the derived vulnerability measurements and flood exposure and the impacts of coastal flash floods triggered by Tropical Storm Washi in the southern Philippines in December 2011.

Ignacio, J. Andres F.; Cruz, Grace T.; Nardi, Fernando; Henry, Sabine. 2016. Assessing the effectiveness of a social vulnerability index in predicting heterogeneity in the impacts of natural hazards: Case study of the Tropical Storm Washi flood in the Philippines. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):91–129

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s91
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research

The author lsited her arguments as to why population scientists should get involved in the climate change studies.

Gage, Anastasia J. 2016. The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 19–22

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s19
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective

Using the 2015 meeting of the Population Association of America program, the author discussed the possible reason why demographers are reluctant to address population and environmental issues.

McDonald, Peter. 2016. Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 15–17

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s15
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Climate shocks and migration: an agent-based modeling approach

The authors constructed an agent-based model derived from qualitative and quantitative analyses of a well-studied demographic field site, Nang Rong district, northeast Thailand, to examine how climate shocks might affect migration in rural agricultural areas.

Entwisle, B., N. E. Williams, A. M. Verdery, R. R. Rindfuss, S. J. Walsh, G. P. Malanson, P. J. Mucha, B. G. Frizzelle, P. M. McDaniel, X. Yao, B. W. Heumann, P. Prasartkul, Y. Sawangdee and A. Jampaklay. 2016. Climate shocks and migration: an agent-based modeling approach. Population and Environment 38(1): 47-71

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0254-y
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives

This study covers outcomes from our field research in Male, the capital of Maldives, in 2013, using quantitative questionnaires with local respondents (N=347). The results suggest that, besides a set of actually experienced environmental and climate challenges, slow-onset climate change impacts such as sea-level rise are perceived as being one of the key factors affecting Maldivian society and livelihoods.

Stojanov, R., B. Duží, I. Kelman, D. Němec and D. Procházka. 2016. Local perceptions of climate change impacts and migration patterns in Malé, Maldives. The Geographical Journal, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12177

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12177
Journal Article
Year: 2016

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