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Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean

Using a 14-year MODIS time series, between 2000 and 2014, the study calculated statistical trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI—a spectral index representing vegetation cover) to identify areas where vegetation cover has either increased or decreased.  There are 125 study areas chosen where statistically significant changes in NDVI were found and used time series of monthly rainfall, Landsat images, Google Earth images and environmental GIS layers to identify the type and cause of landscape changes.

Levin, N. 2016.  Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean.  Regional Environmental Change 16(4): 1197-1211.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0848-4
Year: 2016

Environmental Migration and Social Inequality

This is a collection of leading-edge research from leading international scholars on the link between environmental migration and social/economic inequality. It presents recent mpirical evidence on environmental migration dynamics from Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, China, Ghana, Haiti, Mexico, and Turkey.

McLeman, Robert, Schade, Jeanette, Faist, Thomas (Eds.). 2016. Environmental Migration and Social Inequality. Advances in Global Change Research, Vol. 61. Springer International Publishing.
DOI: https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-25796-9
Year: 2016

Human–environment interactions in population and ecosystem health

The paper discusses the builds on recent momentum in the development and implementation of transdisciplinary collaborations that simultaneously consider human, nonhuman, and environmental health and the nonlinear relationships between them.

Galvani, A. P., C. T. Bauch, M. Anand, B. H. Singer and S. A. Levin. 2016. Human–environment interactions in population and ecosystem health. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(51): 14502-14506.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1618138113
Year: 2016

Shifting environmental concern in rural eastern Oregon: the role of demographic and place-based factors

Based on cross-sectional telephone survey data collected, the study assesses the degree to which demographic and place-based factors are associated with changing public opinions on climate change, wolves, renewable energy, and land development regulations in rural northeast Oregon.

Boag, A. E., L. C. Hamilton, J. Hartter, F. R. Stevens, M. W. Palace and M. J. Ducey. 2016. Shifting environmental concern in rural eastern Oregon: the role of demographic and place-based factors. Population and Environment 38(2): 207-216.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0261-z
Year: 2016

Spatial analysis of urbanization patterns: the case of land use and population density in the Milan metropolitan area

We analyze the patterns of urbanization, measured with population density and the share of urbanized area, considering the territories of the enlarged Milan metropolitan area.

Guastella, G. and S. Pareglio. 2016. Spatial analysis of urbanization patterns: the case of land use and population density in the Milan metropolitan area. Review of Urban & Regional Development Studies, doi: 10.1111/rurd.12060.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/rurd.12060
Year: 2016

Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand

Using a unique panel surveys dataset from rural Thailand, the paper explores the causes cited by surveyed household members for why the respondent’s household had a bad income year, and the associated demographic characteristics across households in which the respondent reported that environmental and other economic problems represented risk factors.

Meijer-Irons, Jacqueline. 2016. Who perceives what? A demographic analysis of subjective perception in rural Thailand. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):167–191

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s167
Year: 2016

Household migration as a livelihood adaptation in response to a natural disaster: Nicaragua and Hurricane Mitch

Using data drawn from the Nicaragua Living Standards and Measurement Study Survey, this study examines international livelihood migrations from Nicaragua in the years surrounding the rapid-onset Hurricane Mitch event of 1998.

Loebach, P. 2016. Household migration as a livelihood adaptation in response to a natural disaster: Nicaragua and Hurricane Mitch. Population and Environment 38(2): 185-206.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0256-9
Year: 2016

Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way?

Using the case of Shishmaref, Alaska, a rural Iñupiat community on the northwest coast of Alaska facing habitual flooding disasters linked to climate change, this article integrates research on disasters and climate change-induced migration with emerging perspectives from environmental psychology and the psychology of natural disasters to consider the potential costs of particular migration scenarios.

Wolsko, C. and E. Marino. 2016. Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way? Population and Environment 37(4): 411-428.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0248-1
Year: 2016

Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective

Using the 2015 meeting of the Population Association of America program, the author discussed the possible reason why demographers are reluctant to address population and environmental issues.

McDonald, Peter. 2016. Engagement of demographers in environmental issues from a historical perspective. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 15–17

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s15
Year: 2016

(Un) natural disaster: vulnerability, long-distance displacement, and the extended geography of neighborhood distress and attainment after Katrina

The study investigates a sample of vulnerable families displaced by Katrina, seven hundred low-income, mostly minority mothers in community college in New Orleans before Katrina were tracked across the country a year and a half later, compared to their neighborhoods before Katrina and the neighborhoods of those who returned or stayed behind.

Graif, C.  2016. (Un)natural disaster: vulnerability, long-distance displacement, and the extended geography of neighborhood distress and attainment after Katrina. Population and Environment 37(3): 288-318.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0243-6
Year: 2016

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