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At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland

Using a unique time series of aerial photographs from 1936 to 2006, the authors argue that understanding rates at which marginal lands in the Great Plains are used for cultivation since the Great Depression requires understanding the interacting dynamics of demography, technology and policy.

Sylvester, K. M., M. P. Gutmann and D. G. Brown. 2016. At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland. Population and Environment 37(3): 362-390.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0242-7
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Ghana's cocoa frontier in trnsistion: the role of migration and livelihood diversification

The article draws on fieldwork data collected between 2005 and 2013 from the Juaboso District, located in the heart of Ghana’s current cocoa frontier in the Western Region, this article aims to examine how immigration and frontier dynamics in the region are contributing to livelihood transitions and small town development, and how this process is gradually becoming delinked from the production of cocoa.

Knudsen, M. H. and J. Agergaard. 2015. Ghana's cocoa frontier in trnsistion: the role of migration and livelihood diversification.  Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography 97(4): 325-342.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geob.12084
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Impact of the Syrian refugee crisis on land use and transboundary freshwater resources

The study uses satellite imagery of war-torn Syria, to show how conflict and migration caused sudden reductions in Syrian agricultural land use and water use.

Müller, M. F., J. Yoon, S. M. Gorelick, N. Avisse and A. Tilmant. 2016. Impact of the Syrian refugee crisis on land use and transboundary freshwater resources. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(52): 14932-14937.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1614342113
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Climigration? Population and climate change in Arctic Alaska

Using a database, containing annual time series of population and net migration from 43 communities over 1990–2014, the authors systematically test for climigration by comparing out-migration rates from the most threatened communities with those from other, generally similar places.

Hamilton, L. C., K. Saito, P. A. Loring, R. B. Lammers and H. P. Huntington. 2016. Climigration? Population and climate change in Arctic Alaska. Population and Environment 38(2): 115-133.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0259-6
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Climate, migration, and the local food security context: introducing Terra Populus

The article introduces a new, publically available data extraction system Terra Populus (TerraPop), which was designed to facilitate population–environment studies.  The use of TerraPop was showcased by exploring variations in the climate–migration association in Burkina Faso and Senegal based on differences in the local food security context.

Nawrotzki, R. J., A. M. Schlak and T. A. Kugler. 2016. Climate, migration, and the local food security context: introducing Terra Populus. Population and Environment 38(2): 164-184.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0260-0
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The relative importance of climate change and population growth for exposure to future extreme droughts

Results from this study show that at the national level, 129 countries will experience increase in drought exposure mainly due to climate change alone; 23 countries primarily due to population growth; and 38 countries primarily due to the interaction between climate change and population growth.

Smirnov, O., M. Zhang, T. Xiao, J. Orbell, A. Lobben and J. Gordon. 2016. The relative importance of climate change and population growth for exposure to future extreme droughts. Climatic Change 138(1): 41-53

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10584-016-1716-z
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals leads to lower world population growth

Based on a multidimensional model of population dynamics that stratifies national populations by age, sex, and level of education with educational fertility and mortality differentials, the study shows the extent to which the expected world population growth could be lowered by successfully implementing the recently agreed-upon Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Abel, G. J., B. Barakat, S. KC and W. Lutz. 2016. Meeting the Sustainable Development Goals leads to lower world population growth. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(50): 14294-14299.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1611386113
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Household migration as a livelihood adaptation in response to a natural disaster: Nicaragua and Hurricane Mitch

Using data drawn from the Nicaragua Living Standards and Measurement Study Survey, this study examines international livelihood migrations from Nicaragua in the years surrounding the rapid-onset Hurricane Mitch event of 1998.

Loebach, P. 2016. Household migration as a livelihood adaptation in response to a natural disaster: Nicaragua and Hurricane Mitch. Population and Environment 38(2): 185-206.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0256-9
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Effects of Population Redistribution on Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Case Study of South Korea

This study used four data sets (i.e., census, environmental, geographical, and GHG emission data) for seven metropolitan cities and 155 county equivalents to analyze how population dynamics affect GHG emissions.

Lee, D., S.-H. Cho, R. K. Roberts and D. M. Lambert. 2016. Effects of Population Redistribution on Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Case Study of South Korea. International Regional Science Review 39(2): 177-202.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0160017615571585
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean

Using a 14-year MODIS time series, between 2000 and 2014, the study calculated statistical trends in the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI—a spectral index representing vegetation cover) to identify areas where vegetation cover has either increased or decreased.  There are 125 study areas chosen where statistically significant changes in NDVI were found and used time series of monthly rainfall, Landsat images, Google Earth images and environmental GIS layers to identify the type and cause of landscape changes.

Levin, N. 2016.  Human factors explain the majority of MODIS-derived trends in vegetation cover in Israel: a densely populated country in the eastern Mediterranean.  Regional Environmental Change 16(4): 1197-1211.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10113-015-0848-4
Journal Article
Year: 2016

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