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Newcomers and oldtimers: Do classification methods matter in the study of amenity migration impacts in rural America?

Drawing on household survey data from nine communities in north-central Colorado, this study applies five migrant–non-migrant classification methods to examine how the differences/similarities between the migrants and non-migrants (or ‘‘newcomers’’ and ‘‘oldtimers’’) may vary across different approaches.

Qin, H. 2016. Newcomers and oldtimers: Do classification methods matter in the study of amenity migration impacts in rural America? Population and Environment 38(1): 101-114

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0252-5
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Structure and agency in development-induced forced migration: the case of Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam

Using longitudinal, qualitative analysis of data from 67 semi-structured interviews conducted over the course of 2 years with 39 households displaced due to the dam of Belo Monte’s rural agricultural population whose homes and land were flooded, the author asks how structural factors such as compensation policies as well as social, financial, and human capital may either foster or constrain migration.

Randell, H. 2016. Structure and agency in development-induced forced migration: the case of Brazil’s Belo Monte Dam. Population and Environment 37(3): 265-287.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0245-4
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Climate shocks and the timing of migration from Mexico

Using combined detailed migration histories and socio-demographic data from the Mexican Migration Project (MMP)2 with daily temperature and precipitation information from the Global Historical Climate Network–Daily (GHCN-D), the study explores the temporally lagged association between a climate shock and future migration and analyzed the risk of Mexico-US migration over a seven-year period after a climate shock

Nawrotzki, R. J. and J. DeWaard. 2016. Climate shocks and the timing of migration from Mexico. Population and Environment 38(1): 72-100

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-016-0255-x
Journal Article
Year: 2016

By all measures: an examination of the relationship between segregation and health risk from air pollution

The paper examines how the health risk from industrial toxins varies by the 19 most commonly used residential segregation measures using segregation measures for the 331 Metropolitan/Primary Metropolitan (M/PMSA) in the continental United States.

Ard, K. 2016. By all measures: an examination of the relationship between segregation and health risk from air pollution. Population and Environment 38(1): 1-20

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0251-6
Journal Article
Year: 2016

At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland

Using a unique time series of aerial photographs from 1936 to 2006, the authors argue that understanding rates at which marginal lands in the Great Plains are used for cultivation since the Great Depression requires understanding the interacting dynamics of demography, technology and policy.

Sylvester, K. M., M. P. Gutmann and D. G. Brown. 2016. At the margins: agriculture, subsidies and the shifting fate of North America’s native grassland. Population and Environment 37(3): 362-390.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0242-7
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way?

Using the case of Shishmaref, Alaska, a rural Iñupiat community on the northwest coast of Alaska facing habitual flooding disasters linked to climate change, this article integrates research on disasters and climate change-induced migration with emerging perspectives from environmental psychology and the psychology of natural disasters to consider the potential costs of particular migration scenarios.

Wolsko, C. and E. Marino. 2016. Disasters, migrations, and the unintended consequences of urbanization: What’s the harm in getting out of harm’s way? Population and Environment 37(4): 411-428.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11111-015-0248-1
Journal Article
Year: 2016

Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research

The authors discussed four reasons as to why only a few chinese demographers are invloved in climate change research: topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; the discomfort with addressing population and environment issues; and, limitations in funding.

Peng, Xizhe and Zhu, Qin. 2016. Barriers to involvement of Chinese demographers in climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):29–31

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s29
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The Atlas of Environmental Migration

Building on existing knowledge, data and case studies produced over the years by IOM, other international organizations, academia and researchers worldwide, the project will resulted in the first Atlas of Environmental Migration, an innovative tool providing a visual overview of this trend of human migration through maps, illustrations and explanatory texts prepared under the supervision of world experts in this field.

Ionesco, Dina ; Mokhnacheva, Daria; Gemenne, François. 2016. The Atlas of Environmental Migration.Taylor & Francis Group

Year: 2016

Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer

The author outlines the challneges facing a demographer who wanted to venture into climate change research: the complexity of climate science and the limitations of data and methods for integrating the environmental and climate context into the microdata commonly used by demographers; the lack of interdisciplinary collaboration, despite the interconnectedness of the issues of population and climate change; and, the research topics surrounding climate change are more directly related to other social science disciplines than demography.

Hayes, Adrian C. 2016. Population dynamics and climate change: A challenging frontier for the intrepid demographer. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13):33–36

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s33
Journal Article
Year: 2016

The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research

The author lsited her arguments as to why population scientists should get involved in the climate change studies.

Gage, Anastasia J. 2016. The next best time for demographers to contribute to climate change research. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research 2015 (13): 19–22

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1553/populationyearbook2015s19
Journal Article
Year: 2016

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