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Conferences/Workshops/Public Discussions

Geography 2050: The Future of Food
Conference date(s): 14 November 2022 to 18 November 2022

The annual Geography 2050 meeting, held in partnership with the Columbia University Climate School is a multi-year, strategic dialog about the vital trends that will reshape the geography of our planet in the coming decades.  The themes for this year’s symposium include food origins; food sovereignty and food security; agriculture and climate change; investments; and geospatial technology.

Information for registration and details about sponsorship opportunities coming soon, see https://www.geography2050.org/

Special issue call for papers: Population, Food and the Environment
Submission deadline: 31 July 2022

For this special issue of Population and Environment, we seek a range of empirical, theoretical and review papers from multiple social science disciplines, including but not limited to demography, sociology, economics, geography, anthropology, and public health. Topics may explore the complex interactions between environmental change, food security and a wide range of population outcomes such as health, fertility, mortality, migration, urbanization, educational attainment, and labor market performance. Papers may also offer projections of food security and related impacts under future population and climate change scenarios. We are also interested in papers that approach the topic from a different angle, including the role of population dynamics and food production systems as drivers of environmental change in the present and in the future. Theoretical or review papers providing comprehensive and critical discussions of the nexus population-environment-food are highly welcome. We consider contributions at any geographic scale and locations.

Submission Deadline: July 31, 2022. Please submit questions prior to this deadline to Raya Muttarak (muttarak@iiasa.ac.at) or Anna Dimitrova (adimitrova@ucsd.edu), the Guest Editors of this Special Issue, or Elizabeth Fussell (Elizabeth_Fussell@brown.edu), Editor-in-Chief.

https://www.springer.com/journal/11111/updates/19250858

Call for papers "Population, Food and the Environment" in the journal Population and Environment
Submission deadline: 30 July 2022

The focus of the special issue is on “Population, Food and the Environment”, and the Guest Editors are Raya Muttarak and Anna Dimitrova

Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 seeks to “[e]nd hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.” The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that the global population affected by severe food insecurity increased to 750 million in 2019. This negative trend is likely to continue given the rise in poverty due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Moreover, the increasing frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as floods, droughts, wildfires, and temperature extremes induced by climate change adversely impact agricultural production. These events can directly affect livelihoods and food security through a reduction in food availability or indirectly through a reduction in agricultural income, increased unemployment, higher food prices, or violent conflict. The potential impact of environmental change on food production, distribution and access can have multiple ‘knock-on’ effects in other areas of human life, including health, migration, urbanization, and overall socio-economic development. Childhood malnutrition, for instance, which is closely linked with food insecurity, has long lasting impacts on health and wellbeing, ranging from physical and mental health, to cognitive development and labor market performance. Food insecurity can also influence population dynamics: fertility (e.g., through affecting maternal and fetal health), mortality (e.g., through increasing health risks), and migration (e.g., through disruptions of livelihoods or conflict). Given nations’ unequal vulnerability and capacity to respond and adapt to climate change, the impacts mentioned above will vary across geographies and population subgroups. Population, food and the environment are therefore closely connected.

For this special issue, the editors seek a range of empirical, theoretical and review papers from multiple social science disciplines, including but not limited to demography, sociology, economics, geography, anthropology, and public health. Topics may explore the complex interactions between environmental change, food security and a wide range of population outcomes such as health, fertility, mortality, migration, urbanization, educational attainment, and labor market performance. Papers may also offer projections of food security and related impacts under future population and climate change scenarios. We are also interested in papers that approach the topic from a different angle, including the role of population dynamics and food production systems as drivers of environmental change in the present and in the future. Theoretical or review papers providing comprehensive and critical discussions of the nexus population-environment-food are highly welcome. The Editors consider contributions at any geographic scale and locations.

The deadline for submission is 30 July 2022.

Please contact Raya Muttarak (muttarak@iiasa.ac.at) or Anna Dimitrova (adimitrova@ucsd.edu) if you have any queries about the Special Issue.

Scenarios Forum, 20-22 June 2022, Laxenburg, Austria
Session date(s): 20 June 2022 to 22 June 2022

The forum brings together a diverse set of communities who are using or developing scenarios for use in climate change and sustainability analysis to:
•    exchange experiences, ideas, and lessons learned;
•    identify opportunities for synergies and collaboration;
•    reflect on the use of scenarios; and
•    identify knowledge gaps for future research.

By taking stock of recent progress, reflecting on the use of scenarios in environmental assessments and policy-making, and facilitating further scenario-related research, this meeting will inform the use of scenarios in the preparation for the next cycle of IPCC Assessment Reports (AR7) and help ensure a research base sufficient to inform future national and international assessments as well as policy initiatives, including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Scenarios Forum will be taking place as an in-person and partly online conference at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) in Laxenburg, Austria.

For more information, see https://scenariosforum.org/

Call for manuscripts, Latin American Population Review (Revista Latinoamericana de Población) (RELAP)
Submission deadline: 30 May 2022

RELAP seeks to disseminate demographic research in Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as to provide a forum for the debate on research agendas, demographic problems and definition of population policies for the region.

RELAP is an open access journal, based on the principle of offering free access to research and contributing to a greater global exchange of knowledge, and does not charge authors for the reception, processing or publication of their work (Article Processing Charges, APC). In addition, since 2022 it became a continuous publication, thus significantly shortening publication times.

RELAP is open to receiving manuscripts (in Spanish, Portuguese or English) throughout the year, and editors would like to invite submission of contributions (research papers, as well as book reviews) for possible inclusion in the volume of RELAP 2022.  

The deadline for submitting papers to be considered in the 2022 volume is Monday, 30 May 2022.

The manuscripts should be sent to the following email: revista.relap@gmail.com

RELAP carries out a double-blind review process for all the manuscripts it receives (bibliographic reviews are exempt from this process). The updated guidelines for authors can be consulted at http://revistarelap.com/index.php/relap/envios

KNOMAD commissions two papers to advance an urban studies perspective on climate migration
Submission deadline: 06 May 2022

In mid-January 2022, KNOMAD held a roundtable discussion on an urban studies perspective on climate migration.  The roundtable helped identify various relevant possible avenues, topics, and questions for research.

Among the suggested options, and within the available budget, KNOMAD has decided to commission two papers that are detailed further below. At this point, KNOMAD is only asking for an expression of interest in writing one of the papers and/or recommendations for authors for the papers—not for the submission of a formal proposal.

KNOMAD TWG on Environmental Change & Migration

Paper 1: Best practices, gaps, and opportunities for data use in urban planning for climate migration

(a)    What data already exist? To what extent is data on migration (and climate migration in particular) used by local officials and urban planners for long-term city development, such as in urban services and infrastructure?

(b)   What are gaps in data? What additional data would they need for policy coherence, anticipatory action and efficacious long-term responses?

(c)    How can urban actors be incentivized to make use of existing data? What are best practices and opportunities for the future?

Paper 2: Who are climate migrants to cities?

(a)    Selectivity: How does climate migration compare with other bases for rural-to-urban migration in terms of selection of migrants, selection of destinations, likelihood of return, employment choices and prospects, and impacts on cities?

(b)    Migrants’ characteristics: What are the characteristics of climate migrants—age, gender, ethnicity, health status, wealth, skills—and how do these characteristics affect flows as well as resilience and integration at destination?

Formal requirements

Completed papers should be between 10,000-12,500 words, including an Executive Summary (not counting the Bibliography). The paper should be in English, using language that is accessible to policymakers and practitioners as well as researchers.
 
Timelines

Draft paper:  July 31, 2022

Final paper: October 1, 2022

Honorarium
An honorarium of US$10,000 will be offered to those invited to prepare each paper.

Please submit expressions of interest or recommendations for authors no later than May 6, 2022 to all of the following contact persons:
 
T. Alexander Aleinikoff, Chair of KNOMAD’s TWG on Environmental Change and Migration, at aleinikt@newschool.edu

Kanta Kumari Rigaud, Co-Chair of KNOMAD’s TWG on Environmental Change and Migration, at kkumari@worldbank.org

Sonia Plaza, Focal Point for KNOMAD’s TWG on Environmental Change and Migration, at splaza@worldbank.org

Jonas Bergmann, Consultant for KNOMAD’s TWG on Environmental Change and Migration, at jb2406@georgetown.edu

Call for Papers: X Congress of the Latin America Population Association (ALAP), 6-9 December 2022
Submission deadline: 02 May 2022

The Latin American Population Association (ALAP) invites its associate members, researchers, professors, students, public servants, civil and international organizations professionals, and those interested in population studies to participate at its X Congress, under the topic Sanitary, political, and socioeconomic crisis in Latin America and the Caribbean: the contribution of population studies. One of the General Thematic Areas is Population and Environment.

Deadline for submitting extended abstracts or complete papers: Monday, 2 May 2022. For more information (English, Spanish, and Portuguese), including how to submit: https://eventos.galoa.com.br/alap-2022/page/1493-convocatorias

Call for Papers: BSPS Annual Conference 2022, 5-7 September 2022 (University of Winchester)
Submission deadline: 24 April 2022

The British Society for Population Studies (BSPS) is inviting submissions of proposals for presentations and posters for this in-person conference. Abstracts for papers and posters across the entire demographic and population studies spectrum are welcomed.

Lancaster University, UK led by Dr. Jasmine Fledderjohann is organizing a strand on food in(security) and food systems. The team invites submissions for this strand.

Short details about the session Food systems & food (in)security:

This strand explores food systems and food insecurity. Food insecurity is associated with a range of negative outcomes across the life course, with serious implications for health, well-being, and economic development. The highest rates of food insecurity globally are found in the Global South--a situation in which climate change will continue to exacerbate in the coming years. Moreover, Covid-19 has cast a light on the instability of food systems and has contributed to growing food insecurity globally. Proposals focused on the Global South, global food systems, and comparative perspectives would be particularly welcomed. Specific sessions could include food Insecurity, food systems, and Covid-19; modeling food insecurity: data and methods; determinants and consequences of food insecurity across the life course; food insecurity, inequalities, and social policy. For any query, please contact to: Strand organizer: Dr. Jasmine Fledderjohann (Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Social Work, Lancaster University, UK) – j.fledderjohann@lancaster.ac.uk; website: https://www.lancaster.ac.uk/sociology/people/jasmine-fledderjohann

The submission deadline for all abstract submissions: 24th April 2022

For more information about the conference and how to submit a paper, see https://www.lse.ac.uk/social-policy/research/Research-clusters/british-s...

Special issue call for papers: Vulnerable populations: The role of population dynamics in climate change resilience and adaptation
Posted: 13 April 2022

The proposed special issue of The Journal of Population and Sustainability will focus on population growth as a factor in the resilience and adaptive capacity of communities in facing the impacts of climate change. The Editors interested in publishing papers examining both natural population growth and those considering local growth due to migration, including the effects of urbanisation upon the vulnerability of urban populations to climate change. In addition, papers considering the effects on resilience and adaptation resulting from migration from the Global South to the Global North are welcomed. Moreover, they are particularly interested in papers examining how climate change relates to the vulnerability of particular demographic groups, especially children and women in high fertility countries.

Abstracts for proposed papers should be submitted to the editor of the JP&S, David Samways, by email:  editor@jpopsus.org.

FP/Earth Database Update - Mise à jour de la base de données FP/Earth
Posted: 13 April 2022

French follows/ Le français suit

FP/Earth, a project supported by the Population Institute, has published the latest update to its open-source database of peer-reviewed research that sheds light on the synergy between reproductive autonomy and environmental sustainability. It contains new articles from around the world on topics such as the ethics of climate change policies and reproduction (in French), the toxification of the population discourse, the conservation initiative Nature Needs Half, US public perceptions on population, the demographic drivers of urban health and risk in the global south, and much more. A useful resource for researchers and those interested in crafting multi-disciplinary, cross-sectoral programs and policies that can advance both human rights and sustainability. https://fpearth.org/selected-research-1

----

FP/Earth est un projet du Population Institute visant à faire avancer la discussion sur le lien entre autonomie reproductive et viabilité environnementale. Nous venons de mettre à jour notre base de données comportant des articles scientifiques sur ce sujet. Pour la première fois, nous y avons inclus des articles en français. Les nouveaux articles portent sur l’éthique climatique, sur la question des choix procréatifs, la toxification des discours liés aux dynamiques de population (en Anglais), l’initiative Nature Needs Half  (en anglais), les perceptions sur la population aux États-Unis (en anglais), les facteurs démographiques associés à la santé et au risque en milieu urbain dans les pays du Sud (en anglais), et bien d’autres encore. Cette base de données est une ressource utile pour ceux qui cherchent à élaborer des programmes et politiques intersectoriels et multidisciplinaires visant à faire avancer à la fois les droits reproductifs et la viabilité environnementale. https://fpearth.org/notre-travail#0fb27651-a553-4317-b3d5-b103ee06b013

Funding/Study/Work Opportunities

Professor in Risk and Disaster Reduction. UCL - Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR))
Application deadline: 03 May 2022

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) is an exciting cross-UCL Institute, which leads research, knowledge exchange and teaching in the fields of risk and disaster reduction and humanitarian action. The IRDR has established the Cascading Crises Group, Centre for Digital Public Health in Emergencies, Centre for Gender and Disaster and the Humanitarian Institute and is developing research around the themes of disaster risk reduction and resilience, cascading crises and catastrophe modelling, natural hazards, climate change risks and adaptation, humanitarian crisis response, law and economics, conflict and migration, digital health in emergencies, and gender responsive resilience, in order to integrate education, research, innovation and enterprise for the long-term benefit of humanity. The IRDR has received substantial research funding (£6.5 million+) in areas such as gender responsive resilience, digital health, hazard and risk uncertainty modelling, and crisis migration.

The main purpose of the job is to carry out research, teaching and administration within the IRDR, especially in the areas of risk and disaster reduction, and to contribute to curriculum development and teaching on the IRDR. This is an open-ended academic position, available from September 2022.

The postholder should hold a PhD in a relevant field. They should have a track record of high-quality research and research impact especially in the area of risk and disaster reduction. They should have the ability to deliver public presentations, as well as the ability to write clearly for a range of audiences. They should be committed to high quality research, teaching, and fostering a positive learning environment for students. The appointment will be made at Professor (Grade 10) level.

Applicants should apply online. To access further details about the position and how to apply please see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/CON598/professor-in-risk-and-disaster-reduction

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Professor Peter Sammonds, p.sammonds@ucl.ac.uk.

For any queries about the application process or if you are unable to apply online, please contact the departmental manager on irdr-enquiries@ucl.ac.uk.

Latest time for the submission of applications: 3rd May 2022

Interview date 25th May 2022.

Professor of Geophysical Hazard Risks. UCL - Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR))
Application deadline: 03 May 2022

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) is an exciting cross-UCL Institute, which leads research, knowledge exchange and teaching in the fields of risk and disaster reduction and humanitarian action. The IRDR has established the Cascading Crises Group, Centre for Digital Public Health in Emergencies, Centre for Gender and Disaster and the Humanitarian Institute and is developing research around the themes of disaster risk reduction and resilience, cascading crises and catastrophe modelling, natural hazards, climate change risks and adaptation, humanitarian crisis response, law and economics, conflict and migration, digital health in emergencies, and gender responsive resilience, in order to integrate education, research, innovation and enterprise for the long-term benefit of humanity. The IRDR has received substantial research funding (£6.5 million+) in areas such as gender responsive resilience, digital health, hazard and risk uncertainty modelling, and crisis migration.

The main purpose of the job is to carry out research, teaching and administration within the IRDR, especially in the broad area of geophysical hazard risks and resilience, and to contribute to curriculum development and teaching on the IRDR. This is an open-ended academic position, available from September 2022.

The postholder should hold a PhD in a relevant field. They should have a track record of high-quality research and research impact especially in the broad area of geophysical hazard risks and resilience. They should have the ability to deliver public presentations, as well as the ability to write clearly for a range of audiences. They should be committed to high quality research, teaching, and fostering a positive learning environment for students. The appointment will be made at Professor (Grade 10) level.

Applicants should apply online. To access further details about the position and how to apply please see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/CON502/professor-of-geophysical-hazard-risks

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Professor Peter Sammonds, p.sammonds@ucl.ac.uk .

For any queries about the application process or are unable to apply online, please contact the departmental manager on irdr-enquiries@ucl.ac.uk.

Latest time for the submission of applications: 3rd May 2022

Interview Date: 26th May 2022

Senior Research Fellow (RiskPACC). UCL - Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR))
Application deadline: 25 April 2022

The UCL Institute for Risk and Disaster Reduction (IRDR) is a cross-UCL Institute, which aims to lead research, knowledge exchange, and advanced teaching in the area of risk and disaster reduction. IRDR aims to achieve leadership in risk and disaster reduction both in the UK and internationally. The Centre for Gender and Disaster (CGD) is one of IRDR’s research centres. It aims to develop awareness of, and responsiveness to, gender considerations in the contexts of risks, disasters and conflicts, through excellence in research and teaching.

The IRDR is seeking a Postdoctoral Research Fellow to work on the project ‘RiskPACC - Integrating Risk Perception and Action to enhance Civil protection-Citizen interaction’ which is a Horizon 2020 project funded by the European Commission https://www.riskpacc.eu. The Centre for Gender and Disaster is one of 20 RiskPACC partners and has a particular responsibility for the development of the RiskPACC Collaborative Framework. The successful candidate will contribute to all aspects of the work contracted to CGD which includes literature reviews, conceptual design and analysis, engaging with Civil Protection Authorities and citizen groups, contributing to and evaluating the RiskPACC Co-Creation Workshops, and preparing reports and presentations to RiskPACC Partners, the European Commission and more widely to academic and technical audiences. The successful candidate will play an important role in advancing academic and stakeholder community understanding of the best means to develop collaborative and constructive relationships between Civil Protection Authorities and citizens.

Applicants should apply online. To access further details about the position and how to apply please see https://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/COI185/senior-research-fellow-riskpacc.

For an informal discussion about the post, please contact Professor Maureen Fordham at m.fordham@ucl.ac.uk

For any queries about the application process or are unable to apply online, please contact the departmental manager on irdr-enquiries@ucl.ac.uk.

Latest time for the submission of applications: 25th April 2022

2022 ICPSR Summer Program: Courses in Statistics & Quantitative Methods
Posted: 18 April 2022

Registration is now open for the 2022 ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research. Founded in 1963, the ICPSR Summer Program offers rigorous, hands-on training in statistics, quantitative and qualitative methods, and data analysis for students, faculty, and researchers of all skill levels and backgrounds. All 2022 courses will be offered in a hybrid format, and participants can choose to attend either in-person or online.

For more information, visit icpsr.umich.edu/sumprog or contact sumprog@icpsr.umich.edu.

SHORT WORKSHOPS
For those needing to learn a specific methodological technique in just a few days, the Summer Program offers more than 35 short workshops from May through August. Topics include machine learning, group-based trajectory modeling, multilevel modeling, process tracing, IRT, meta-analysis, mixed methods, network analysis, quantitative methods to advance DEI, and more.

FOUR WEEK SESSIONS
Held in Ann Arbor, the four-week sessions provide an immersive learning experience—think “summer camp for social scientists”! Participants in the First Session (June 20-July 15) and Second Session (July 18-August 12) can choose from more than 40 courses, including regression, Bayes, longitudinal analysis, game theory, MLE, SEM, causal inference, machine learning, multilevel models, data visualization, and more. *REGISTER BEFORE MAY 15 AND SAVE HUNDREDS OF DOLLARS!*

Belmont Forum - Integrated Approaches to Human Migration/Mobility in an Era of Rapid Global Change
Posted: 13 April 2022

The Belmont Forum is pleased to announce the launch of a collaborative research networking call on the theme: Systems of Sustainable Consumption and Production.

Organizers solicit proposals that contribute to an integrated systems approach to accurately characterize migration and mobility and its intersection with Global Change, both closely related and intersecting phenomena. Successful proposals will focus on illuminating the determinants of migration – why people move, do not move, from and to where and when, and on what time scale, in relation to Global Change processes like environmental and climate change, demographic changes, consumption patterns, energy use and land-use. Exploration of dependencies, linkages, and / or impacts between Global Change, migration and mobility, human constructs, social science and humanities approaches, and other studies are encouraged. Within this theme, there are three areas to consider including (1) data and methodology, (2) policy, and (3) human-centric approaches that integrate human perspectives and needs in all steps and aspects of a project and beyond.

Call themes:

    Area 1 – synthesizing, integrating, and supplementing data and models
    Area 2 – integrative governance and legal and policy frameworks
    Area 3 – human-centric approaches to studying and integrating data and frameworks on vulnerable communities

For more information, see https://belmontforum.org/cras#migration2022

Open Position - Tenure Track in Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA Lyon) (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon (INSA Lyon))
Posted: 13 April 2022

A junior professor position (tenure-track) entitled "Data for Sustainable Smart Cities" is available at the engineer school INSA Lyon (France), with a research assignment at LIRIS (UMR CNRS 5205) Laboratory and a teaching assignment at the Computer Science Department (IF).

The school is looking for candidates in computer science who have demonstrated an interest in interdisciplinary interactions related to the challenges of the smart and sustainable city, particularly on the following topics: Urban monitoring, data flow, big data, geometric modeling, digital twins, services, image and video analysis, digital eco-responsible.

The candidate will need to have at least two years of post-doctoral experience with a proven track record of international work and leading research results.

The position can be filled on September 1, 2022 as a 4-year fixed-term contract, followed by tenure as a university (full) professor at INSA Lyon on September 1, 2026.

A financial package is associated with the chair, including the financing of a PhD and a postdoc. A teaching load of 64 hours per year for 4 years will also be provided by the chairholder.
 
The job description is available on the LIRIS website:
https://liris.cnrs.fr/emploi/chaire-professeur-junior-donnees-pour-ville...

This chair will also soon be available on the French national Galaxie application portal:
https://www.galaxie.enseignementsup-recherche.gouv.fr/ensup/cand_postes_...

Contact persons:

- For research: Jean-Marc Petit (Director of LIRIS): jean-marc.petit@liris.cnrs.fr
- In teaching: Lionel Brunie (Director of the department): lionel.brunie@insa-lyon.fr

Candidates are invited to contact us as soon as possible.

A seminar may be proposed in April for a competition to be held in May-June 2022.

Public Health Sciences- Associate/Professor, University of Miami (University of Miami)
Posted: 13 April 2022

The Division of Environment and Public Health in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine is seeking an exceptional candidate for an open rank tenure track or tenured Associate/Full Professor (with competitive start-up package) in the broader areas of climate and health.

The search is open to all areas of climate and/or environmental health, with preference given to individuals whose research and teaching complement one or more of the following areas: 1) time-space modeling of the health effects of climate and/or extreme weather events; 2) environmental exposure assessment by developing and utilizing novel technologies and/or methodologies; 3) environmental and/or weather and/or climate exposures related to health risk projections/predictions; 4) the cost-benefit analysis of policies/interventions to mitigate/manage the health effects of climate, extreme weather events and/or other environmental exposures; and 5) developing and implementing evidence-based interventions to mitigate and manage the health effects due to environmental exposures, changing climate and weather patterns or climate/weather modified/mediated health environmental exposures.

The successful candidate should have an earned Ph.D. in a relevant discipline, such as environmental health, statistics, biostatistics, engineering, economics, and occupational health. The selected candidate will be expected to teach graduate classes, mentor graduate students, and actively participate in campus-wide transdisciplinary training efforts in climate and health and the resilience academy. Senior faculty will be expected to play a leadership role within the department, and to promote interdisciplinary research throughout the University in the field of candidate’s expertise.

For more information on the position or to apply for the position, see
https://umiami.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/UMFaculty/job/Miami-FL/Public-Healt...

USIP Senior Program Officer, Climate, Environment, and Conflict
13 April 2022

The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) is an independent, non-partisan institution and are actively engaged with peacebuilding efforts worldwide.

The Senior Program Officer (SPO) is expected to play a critical role in advancing strategic priorities for USIP’s new Climate, Environment, and Conflict (CEC) program. The successful candidate will take a lead role in overseeing research and USIP publications, convening and leading policy conversations, cultivating partner relationships, and organizing an internal speaker and discussion series. Additionally, the SPO will support the formulation of new program concepts that integrate climate and environment issues into USIP’s core practice areas, including technical support for environmental peacebuilding programs. This position is based in Washington, D.C., and reports to the Senior Advisor of the CEC program.

For more information about this position, see https://recruiting.ultipro.com/UNI1083USIOP/JobBoard/14900d11-c546-42ff-...

Position posted: 23 February 2022

For questions about this position please email recruitment@usip.org. Do not send resumes or attachments to this email address.

Literature/New Additions to Database

A comparison of social vulnerability indices specific to flooding in Ecuador: principal component analysis (PCA) and expert knowledge
13 April 2022

This study is developed particularly to support the Ecuadorian Red Cross (ERC) in building a social vulnerability index. Combined with hazard and exposure information, the social vulnerability index will be used as an input for impact-based forecasts for flash-floods, and to inform flash flood early action protocol at the administrative level 3 (Parroquia) in Ecuador.

Author(s): Agathe Bucherie, Carolynne Hultquist, Susana Adamo, Colleen Neely, Fernanda Ayala, Juan Bazo, Andrew Kruczkiewicz,
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2212420922001169
Juventudes y cambio climático: las intersecciones de género, etnia y edad en la configuración de la vulnerabilidad climática en el sector agrícola en Latinoamérica
13 April 2022

In this chapter, the authors show that there is a diversity of vulnerabilities in the sense that different groups of young people, who have different degrees of exposure to climate change and may have differentiated resources to deal with them. For this, they examine the threat of high temperatures in the agricultural sector and the differences in vulnerability between the profiles of young people employed in the sector in Mexico, Guatemala, Peru and Chile. Results show that the interaction between location, age, ethnicity and gender builds different exposure profiles, which add to each country’s unequal threats and strengths institutions to build distinct vulnerabilities to climate change. The analysis highlights the greatest vulnerability of the young indigenous population and the gender differences, along with showing an increase in exposure to the threat of  high temperatures for young generations in the future. This underlines the need to develop public policies that address and listen to the demands and needs of this group, and respond to the principle of intergenerational justice of sustainable development.

Author(s): Landy Sánchez Peña, Susana Adamo
http://danzarenlasbrumas.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/03/InformeGyJ-DanzarBrumas-…
Biodiversity impacts and conservation implications of urban land expansion projected to 2050
07 April 2022

The study provides evidence that rapidly urbanizing regions are increasingly posing a serious and growing threat to global biodiversity by using a recently developed suite of land-use projections to provide an assessment of projected habitat that will be lost to urban land expansion for 30,393 species of terrestrial vertebrates from 2015 to 2050 across three shared socioeconomic pathway (SSP) scenarios.

Author(s): Rohan D. Simkin, Karen C. Seto, Robert I. McDonald, and Walter Jetz
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2117297119
Sprawling cities are rapidly encroaching on Earth’s biodiversity
07 April 2022

This article provides an easily readable summary of the Simkin et al. paper (https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2117297119), with discussion of its important findings and implications.

Author(s): William F. Laurance, and Jayden Engert
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2202244119
Climate events and the role of adaptive capacity for (im-)mobility
06 April 2022

Using survey data from regions of Cambodia, Nicaragua, Peru, Uganda, and Vietnam, the study examines the relationship between sudden- and gradual-onset climate events and migration, hypothesizing that this relationship is mediated by the adaptive capacity of affected individuals.

Author(s): Vally Koubi, Lena Schaffer, Gabriele Spilker, & obias Böhmelt
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00395-5
An Open-Source Model for Projecting Small Area Demographic and Land-Use Change
06 April 2022

This paper sets out the methodology and rationale for the demographic models used by the Infrastructure Transitions Research Consortium (ITRC) and fulfils the following objectives: (1) to demonstrate that demographic estimates are an essential input to infrastructure demand models, (2) to provide an overview of a comprehensive modeling framework that can be used by other modeling teams to produce demographic estimates and projections linked to land-use outputs, and (3) to demonstrate how that framework can be used to explore a range of spatial development scenarios.

Author(s): Nik Lomax, Andrew P. Smith, Luke Archer, Alistair Ford, James Virgo
Urbanization and its effects on land and water resources in Ijebuland, southwestern Nigeria
06 April 2022

Using Landsat images covering the area for 1986, 2000 and 2016, and social surveys (questionnaire administration and key informant interviews), this study examined change in the form and attributes of areas under different land cover in a relatively homogenous Yoruba ethnic group community in Southwestern Nigeria.

Author(s): Margaret Yejide Onanuga, Adebayo Oluwole Eludoyin, & Ifeanyi Emmanuel Ofoezie
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-021-01458-1
Exploring the nexus between natural disasters and food (in)security: Evidence from rural Bangladesh
06 April 2022

Utilising the latest edition of the Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey (BIHS) to understand the determinants of food security and the Food Insecurity Experience Scale (FIES) to measure household food security, this paper examines how natural disaster shocks affect the food security of rural households in Bangladesh.

Author(s): Muhammad Ibrahim Shah, Sakil Ahmmed, Usman Khalid
https://doi.org/10.1111/geoj.12431
Environmental kuznets curve and causal links between environmental degradation and selected socioeconomic indicators in Bangladesh
06 April 2022

By exploring the relationship between economic growth, urbanization, energy consumption, trade openness, human capital and ecological footprints for the period 1972–2018 in Bangladesh, this study has examined the validity of the EKC hypothesis.

Author(s): Nahid Sultana, Mohammad Mafizur Rahman, & Rasheda Khanam
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-021-01665-w
Gender, Environmental Change, and Migration Aspirations and Abilities in Tangier and Tinghir, Morocco
06 April 2022

From qualitative interviews conducted with people living in Tangier and Tinghir (Morocco) from March–May 2018, the main finding of this study is that people in the region of Tinghir are more exposed and sensitive to environmental change compared to those living in Tangier, which also affected the differential impact for men and women of these environmental changes.

Author(s): Lore Van Praag
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10745-021-00296-z
Effects of prenatal exposure to abnormal rainfall on cognitive development in Vietnam
06 April 2022

The study examines the effects of exposure to historically abnormal rainfall among children in utero on the cognitive development of the same children from 5 to 15 years of age using data from the Young Lives project for Vietnam.

Author(s): Nobuaki Yamashita, & Trong-Anh Trinh
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00394-6
Residence in infected neighborhoods and fertility decline during the Zika epidemic in Singapore
06 April 2022

Using survey data were collected from 657 married women between April and July 2018, the study investigates whether fertility decline was significantly higher in neighborhoods containing known Zika cases, compared to unexposed neighborhoods in the city state of Singapore.

Author(s): Poh Lin Tan, & Tikki Pang
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00389-3
Does rubber expansion hinder the migration of rural labor? Evidence from southwest China?
06 April 2022

This study examines the impacts of rubber expansion on the migration of rural labor using two-wave panel data collected from more than 600 smallholder rubber farmers in southwest China.

Author(s): Ningan Yang, Yawen Ding, Shi Min, Junfei Bai
https://doi.org/10.1111/rode.12865
The influence of urbanization on vegetation carbon pools under a tele-coupling framework in China
06 April 2022

This study considered the combined influence from external regions and examines urbanization and its influence on vegetation carbon pool (vegetation carbon storage and NPP) from the perspective of tele-coupling based utilising domestic trade data, land-use images, vegetation carbon densities, NPP data, and using the MRIO model and spatial analysis.

Author(s): Xingbo Yin
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10668-021-01603-w
Accounting for carbon dioxide emission effect of energy use, economic growth, and urbanization in the OPEC member states
05 April 2022

Results from this study show that growth, urbanization and energy use are significant determinants of environmental pollution in the OPEC countries.

Author(s): Rasheed O. Alao, Cem Payaslioglu, Abdulkareem Alhassan, Andrew Adewale Alola
https://doi.org/10.1111/issj.12304
Tropical Storms and Temporary Migration in Vietnam
05 April 2022

The study combines three waves of the Vietnam Household Living Standard Survey with geo-referenced tropical cyclone data from the Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship to provide the first household-level empirical multievent study of temporary internal migration as a consequence of tropical storms.

Author(s): Michael Berlemann, Thi Xuyen Tran
https://doi.org/10.1111/padr.12455
Local perceptions of socio-ecological drivers and effects of coastal armoring: the case of Moorea, French Polynesia
05 April 2022

In this paper, the authors combine results from a longitudinal research program conducted by marine biologists on the dynamics of the local coastal environment and its vulnerability to multiple anthropogenic stressors alongside an ethnographic survey of residents’ perceptions of coastal armoring in Moorea (French Polynesia) and presents a transdisciplinary study focusing on the socio-ecological mechanisms at play in the alteration of Moorea’s coastline.

Author(s): Maëlle Calandra, Jean Wencélius, Rakamaly Madi Moussa, Camille Gache, Cécile Berthe, Viliame Waqalevu, Pascal Ung, Franck Lerouvreur, Tamatoa Bambridge, René Galzin, Frédéric Bertucci, & David Lecchini
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00391-9
Operationalizing and empirically identifying populations trapped in place by climate and environmental stressors in Mexico
05 April 2022

The paper proposes a guiding operational definition and corresponding set of five empirical steps to identify and study trapped populations using data from the Mexican Family Life Survey (MxFLS) as an empirical demonstration.

Author(s): Jack DeWaard, Lori M. Hunter, Mason C. Mathews, Esteban J. Quiñones, Fernando Riosmena, & Daniel H. Simon
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10113-022-01882-7
Years of good life is a well-being indicator designed to serve research on sustainability
05 April 2022

In this paper, the authors introduced a new indicator of human wellbeing called “Years of good Life” (YoGL). This indicator builds on the length of life (i.e. average life expectancy), but since mere survival is not considered enough also incorporates four central constituents of human wellbeing: being out of absolute poverty, enjoying physical and cognitive health, and stating subjective life satisfaction above a minimal level.

Author(s): Wolfgang Lutz, Erich Striessnig, Anna Dimitrova, Simone Ghislandi, Anastasia Lijadi, Claudia Reiter, Sonja Spitzer, and Dilek Yildiz
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1907351118
Recently constructed hydropower dams were associated with reduced economic production, population, and greenness in nearby areas
05 April 2022

The paper analyzed impacts of 631 hydropower dams (≥1-megawatt capacity) constructed since 2001 and commissioned before 2015 for their effects on economy, population, and environment in nearby areas and examined the results in five regions (i.e., Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and South America) and by different dam sizes.

Author(s): Peilei Fan, Myung Sik Cho, Zihan Lin , Zutao Ouyang, Jiaguo Qi, Jiquan Chen, and Emilio F. Moran
https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2108038119
Displaced by climate and disaster-induced relocations: experiences of cascading displacement in Fiji and the Philippines
05 April 2022

The paper explores the impacts of climate and disaster-induced relocations on communities living on, or neighbouring, relocation site land in two countries, Fiji and the Philippines.

Author(s): Karlee Johnson, Sofie Mortensen, Cannelle Gueguen-Teil, and Andreea R. Torre
https://doi.org/10.1111/disa.12475
Is migration an effective adaptation to climate-related agricultural distress in sub-Saharan Africa?
04 April 2022

Through a set of 52 qualitative interviews, this study examines first-time seasonal migration out of Bourasso, a village in North-Western Burkina Faso, to neighbouring countries and provides qualitative evidence demonstrating that in Bourasso climate-related seasonal migration by migrant men was predominately perceived as an erosive or failed strategy.

Author(s): Kira Vinke, Sophia Rottmann, Christoph Gornott, Pascal Zabre, Patricia Nayna Schwerdtle, Rainer Sauerborn
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00393-7
Complex climate and network effects on internal migration in South Africa revealed by a network model
04 April 2022

To analyze mechanisms controlling inter-district migration flows in South Africa and predict migration flows with higher accuracy, the study uses a  a network model, the additive and multiplicative effects model for network (AMEN).

Author(s): Tingyin Xiao, Michael Oppenheimer, Xiaogang He, & Marina Mastrorillo
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11111-021-00392-8
The Biden Administration on Climate Migration
04 April 2022

A discussion of potentiallysignificant implications of climate-related  migration on international security, instability, conflict, and geopolitics.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/padr.12462